Counsel of Chalcedon
You are here:Home-Resources-Counsel of Chalcedon Magazine-1991 Issue 9

1991 Issue 9

As the twentieth century draws to a close, Christians find themselves in what may well turn out to be one of the most interesting periods of human history. As these words are being written, the collapse of communism in the Soviet Union appears firmly established. The people's revolt under the leadership of Boris Yetsin has surged forth in a wave of non-violent overturning of a philosophic system that has starved the Russian people and those who make up the U.S.S.R. The Ukraine, for example, once the bread-basket of eastern Europe has not been able to feed its own people in recent years, let alone export food to other countries.

Each month the "Cross-Examination" column presents a summary statement of a Reformed and Reconstructionist conviction in theology or ethics, and then offers brief answers to common questions, objections or confusions which people have about that belief. Send issues or questions you would like addressed by Dr. Bahnsen to the editor.

Jesus Christ as Creator of heaven and earth is the universal Lord over all men and nations, and over all areas of human life. The Son of God also holds the position of universal Lord in virtue of His incarnation as the Messiah, His saving work, His death, resurrection, and ascension to the right hand of God to rule over all the world.

Psalms of Promise: Exploring The Majesty and Faithfulness of God by E. Calvin Beisner.

The author gives 18 Psalms a deeper meaning as he explores with the reader how the covenant is interwoven in each. The study of the covenant points the reader time and again to the Christ of the covenant. Thus the reader comes away with a deeper sense of God's majesty and faithfulness.

Everything in the Bible is "profitable" for the Christian, and is worth learning and applying, II Tim. 3:16-17. To the extent that the Christian is ignorant of any aspect of revealed truth, to that extent he is deficient and unbalanced. Nothing in the Bible is harmful unless it is twisted and abused, II Pet. 3: 16. The entrance of "the whole counsel of God" into the mind and heart brings light and understanding into the life, Psa. 119:l3O; Acts 20:27. John Calvin wrote: "The Scripture is the school of the Holy Spirit, in which, as nothing useful or necessary to be known is omitted, so nothing is taught which it is not beneficial to know."

There is a difference in praying in conformity with God's will as opposed to praying that God's will be done, which may override our request. When we pray, we are to pray in light of God's revealed will, which is not only accessible to us but commanded that we know. We are to discern God's will as best as we can before we pray, so that when we do pray, we can in faith receive exactly what we asked. As we pray there should be no doubt as to the legitimacy of our prayer; otherwise, we should not be praying for that request.

Often it is the case that revelation comes to man through vision experiences, rather than through verbal communication. The visions God granted to His prophets dramatically opened to their mind's eye what their physical eye could not see. It effectively raised them above the blur and confusion caused by the strife and uncertainty of history. It did so by offering to them a fuller glimpse of reality - a reality that included the spiritual realm. Such a view would impart a peace that passes all understanding, for then would they see things as God saw them.